Friday, May 3, 2013

TEXAS, EPA, TCEQ, RICK PERRY, Lamar Smith (R-Texas), chairman of the Committee on Science, Space and Technology, and the dumbing down of sound science for profit $ i.e. The High Quality Stupid Act

TEXAS, EPA, TCEQ, RICK PERRY, Lamar Smith, GOP and the dumbing down of sound science for profit $ i.e. The High Quality Stupid Act




Environmental groups sue EPA over refinery emissions



4 environmental groups say agency is 'dragging its feet' on air pollution


By Matthew Tresaugue | May 2, 2013 | Updated: May 2, 2013 11:13pm


Environmentalists have filed a lawsuit to force federal regulators to review the way they calculate emissions from petrochemical plants, oil refineries and other large industrial facilities.


In the suit filed on Thursday, Air Alliance Houston and three other groups accuse the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency of using outdated and inaccurate formulas to estimate levels of air pollution.


The groups say studies show that actual smog-forming emissions can be 132 times greater than EPA estimates, which are based on data provided by the industry. The agency, as a result, does not possess reliable data to protect public health, according to the suit filed in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.


"The EPA has a history of dragging its feet on this issue," said Jennifer Duggan, an attorney for the Environmental Integrity Project, a legal group representing Air Alliance Houston and the other organizations in the case. "It has been aware of these inaccuracies for some time."


An EPA spokeswoman said the agency is reviewing the suit but would not provide additional comment.


The lawsuit comes five years after the city of Houston raised similar issues with the federal agency, which uses the emissions data to develop pollution controls, establish limits and guide enforcement.









Lamar Smith, GOP Push Politicization Of Scientific Research



Posted: 04/29/2013 10:29 am EDT | Updated: 04/30/2013 1:25 am EDT



WASHINGTON -- Republicans on the House science committee are making an unprecedented move to require oversight of the scientific research process, pushing a bill that would in effect politicize decisions made by the National Science Foundation, according to a draft of the legislation acquired by The Huffington Post. As part of the same effort, Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas), chairman of the Committee on Science, Space and Technology, sent a letter to the NSF Thursday demanding that it provide supporting materials to justify research that its panels of independent scientists have approved.


The bill, titled the High Quality Research Act and authored by Smith, would require the director of the NSF to certify in writing that every grant handed out by the federal agency is for work that is "the finest quality, is ground breaking, and answers questions or solves problems that are of utmost importance to society at large; and ... is not duplicative of other research project being funded by the Foundation or other Federal science agencies." The bill has not been officially introduced, but HuffPost acquired a draft copy that Smith circulated among colleagues.


The measure would also require federal officials to report back to Congress on how the NSF was implementing the new regulations. Additionally, the bill solicits recommendations for how to place similar restrictions on other federal science agencies.


The requirements laid out in the bill are problematic on several levels. The basic scientific method itself is by its nature duplicative, and is often carried out purely for investigative purposes.


But Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (Texas), the top Democrat on the committee, found the proposal especially alarming after Smith demanded in his letter that the NSF submit to the committee the technical peer review discussions conducted among NSF scientists who decide on grant awards.


"Members of the Committee would benefit from access to the scientific/technical reviews," Smith wrote in his letter last week to acting NSF Director Cora Marrett. Smith highlighted a number of social science studies that he had "concerns" about, including a study called "Picturing Animals in National Geographic, 1888 - 2008," and "The International Criminal Court and the Pursuit of Justice."


Johnson fired back Friday with a letter to Smith saying that his request -- coupled with the legislation -- was a dangerous politicization of one of the most successful scientific research promoters in history.


"Your letter marks the beginning of an investigative effort, the implications of which are profound," Johnson wrote. "This is the first step on a path that would destroy the merit-based review process at NSF and intrudes political pressure into what is widely regarded as the most effective and creative process for awarding research funds in the world."


She goes on to argue that politicians have no business considering themselves on par with scientists when it comes to evaluating scientific merit, noting that no previous chairman of the committee has ever put himself forward as an expert in science.


"Interventions in grant awards by political figures with agenda, biases, and no expertise is the antithesis of the peer review processes," Johnson continued. "By making this request, you are sending a chilling message to the scientific community that peer review will always be trumped by political review."


Smith said in a statement to The Huffington Post that the NSF projects for which he has requested more information do not meet the foundation's standards.


“The NSF has great potential to promote American innovation and expand our economy," Smith said. "When the NSF only has enough money to fund one in seven research proposals, they must ensure that each one is of the highest quality. The proposals about which I have requested further information do not seem to meet the high standards of most NSF-funded projects. Congress has a responsibility to review questionable research paid for by hard-working American taxpayers. If academic or other institutions want to conduct such research on these kinds of subjects they can pay for them with their own private funds. Public funds should be used to benefit the American people."


Smith listed five NSF projects about which he has requested further information.


1. Award Abstract #1247824: “Picturing Animals in National Geographic, 1888-2008,” March 15, 2013, ($227,437);


2. Award Abstract #1230911: “Comparative Histories of Scientific Conservation: Nature, Science, and Society in Patagonian and Amazonian South America,” September 1, 2012 ($195,761);


3. Award Abstract #1230365: “The International Criminal Court and the Pursuit of Justice,” August 15, 2012 ($260,001);


4. Award Abstract #1226483, “Comparative Network Analysis: Mapping Global Social Interactions,” August 15, 2012, ($435,000); and


5. Award Abstract #1157551: “Regulating Accountability and Transparency in China’s Dairy Industry,” June 1, 2012 ($152,464).


Smith, as chairman of the Judiciary Committee last session, led the House legislative effort behind its version of SOPA -- the Stop Online Piracy Act. That effort became highly controversial as opponents saw it as an attempt to inject government into an area where it could stifle innovation. It was ultimately dropped and the legislation rejected.


On Monday, President Obama will speak at the National Academy of Sciences to mark its 150th anniversary.


CORRECTION: The original article misstated the name of the Stop Online Piracy Act as the "Stop Online Privacy Act." It has been corrected.









[DISCUSSION DRAFT]


APRIL 18, 2013


113TH CONGRESS


1ST SESSION H. R. ll


To to be supplied


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES


Ml. llllll introduced the following bill; which was referred to the


Committee on llllllllllllll


A BILL


To to be supplied


Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,


SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.


This Act may be cited as the ‘‘High Quality Research Act’’.


SEC. 2. HIGH QUALITY RESEARCH.


(a) CERTIFICATION.—Prior to making an award of any contract or grant funding for a scientific research project, the Director of the National Science Foundation shall publish a statement on the public website of the Foundation that certifies that the research project—


(1) is in the interests of the United States to advance the national health, prosperity, or welfare, and to secure the national defense by promoting the progress of science;


(2) is the finest quality, is ground breaking, and answers questions or solves problems that are of utmost importance to society at large; and


(3) is not duplicative of other research projects being funded by the Foundation or other Federal science agencies.


(b) TRANSFER OF FUNDS.—Any unobligated funds for projects not meeting the requirements of subsection


(a) may be awarded to other scientific research projects that do meet such requirements.


(c) INITIAL IMPLEMENTATION REPORT.—Not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Director shall report to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate and the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology of the House of Representatives on how the requirements set forth in subsection (a) are being implemented.


(d) NATIONAL SCIENCE BOARD IMPLEMENTATION


REPORT.—Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the National Science Board shall report to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate and the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology of the House of Representatives its findings and recommendations on how the requirements of subsection (a) are being implemented.


(e) IMPLEMENTATION BY OTHER AGENCIES.—Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, in collaboration with the National Science and Technology Council, shall report to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate and the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology of the House of Representatives on how the requirements of subsection (a) may be implemented in other Federal science agencies.


f:\VHLC\041813\041813.033.xml (547049|2)



April 18, 2013 (11:11 a.m.)







West, Texas


The plant had 1,350 times the legally allowed amount of highly explosive ammonium nitrate, yet hadn’t informed the Department of Homeland Security of the danger. Likewise, the fertilizer plant did not have sprinklers, shut-off valves, fire alarms or legally required blast walls, all of which could have prevented the catastrophic damage done. And there was little chance regulators would learn about the problems without the company reporting them: Not only had the Occupation Safety and Health Administration not inspected the plant since 1985, but also, due to underfunding, OSHA can only inspect plants like the one in West on average once every 129 years.







re-Perry defends state oversight in West Texas April 23, 2013



Governor of Texas Rick Perry claims there is no need for more regulations, he is fine with the regulations in place in West Texas, and is confident in that, the fertilizer plant that blew up in West, had not been inspected since 1985. This in a state where industrial regulations are a joke. Governor Perry says, come to Texas, bring your pollution, bring your radioactive nuclear waste, bring your run down chemical plants, Texas does not care, come on down, the water is fine, you can’t swim in it anymore, fish die in it, and don’t eat the fish from Galveston Bay is what the TCEQ states, but come on down anyway, bring us your dollars, your pollution, and we will not even tax you much, come on down to Texas and spew your benzene in the air, we don’t care, we will just not monitor it anymore (bill 791), come to Texas where the flounder fish float upside down, white side up, in Galveston Bay, the water is fine. ...




Monday, March 25, 2013



TCEQ Proposes Removal of Two Pollutants from the Texas City APWL Area--Benzene and Hydrogen Sulfide







Wednesday, April 17, 2013


Radioactive Senate waste bill 791 Sen. Kel Seliger, R-Amarillo and Governor Rick Perry, Totalitarian rule or Authoritarian regime ?







TCEQ don’t eat catfish and speckle trout from Galveston Bay







flounder float white side up in Galveston Bay







Saturday, February 16, 2013


Governor Rick Perry's Nuclear Dump payday $250,000, but what about Texas?







Tuesday, April 29, 2008



Interference at the EPA - Science and Politics at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency



----- Original Message -----


From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr." flounder9@verizon.net


To: "Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy" BSE-L@aegee.org


Cc: heggem.daniel@epa.gov; sibert.christopher@epa.gov; denne.jane@epa.gov; hazen.susan@epa.gov; mcrosby@ucsusa.org; erobinson@ucsusa.org; enegin@ucsusa.org; cjdvoice@yahoogroups.com; madcow@lists.iatp.org


Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 9:48 PM


Subject: Interference at the EPA Science and Politics at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency









Thursday, May 22, 2008


The Junk Science of George W. Bush posted February 19, 2004 (March 8, 2004 issue)








TEXAS TWIA PONZI SCHEME



sucks, we just sent our check in for TWIA, can you say ponzi scheme. there robbing peter to pay paul, and paul and peter are both broke...












Monday, April 15, 2013


Hurricane Ike: 5 Years Later Conference Rice Dike Proposal September 24-25, 2013







Sunday, August 28, 2011


Rick Perry, Texas, BSE aka mad cow disease, CJD, and 12 years of lies there from






Friday, April 19, 2013


APHIS 2013 Stakeholder Meeting (March 2013) BSE TSE PRION







Tuesday, April 30, 2013


Foodborne Transmission of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy to Nonhuman Primates







Tuesday, July 10, 2012


Chronic Wasting Disease Detected in Far West Texas







Monday, February 11, 2013


TEXAS CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD Four New Positives Found in Trans Pecos







Thursday, May 02, 2013


Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Texas Important Update on OBEX ONLY TEXTING













Wednesday, April 24, 2013


Chimpanzees Released After 30 Years Of Testing, Brace Yourself For Smiles








TEXAS, EPA, TCEQ, RICK PERRY, Lamar Smith, GOP and the dumbing down of sound science for profit $ i.e. The High Quality Stupid Act





I love Texas, and I don’t care what you eat. but when the negligence starts to effect my family and myself, then it becomes my business.



personally, I think it’s time for slick rick perry and all his corporate cronies, it’s time for them to go, they have done enough harm to Texas and our people.



rick perry is a cancer to Texas, environmental steward he is not, he never has been, nor will he ever be $




still disgusted in Baciff, Texas,




just my opinion, with some facts, via my 1st amendment rights...





tss

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Radioactive Senate waste bill 791 Sen. Kel Seliger, R-Amarillo and Governor Rick Perry, Totalitarian rule or Authoritarian regime ?

Radioactive Senate waste bill 791 Sen. Kel Seliger, R-Amarillo and Governor Rick Perry, Totalitarian rule or Authoritarian regime ?



Governor Rick Perry and his Republican cronies attempt to Trash TEXAS again, with more nuclear waste, with Radioactive Senate waste bill 791 Sen. Kel Seliger, R-Amarillo.



 
Radioactive waste bill faces opposition



Posted: Wednesday, April 17, 2013 4:00 am | Updated: 7:54 am, Wed Apr 17, 2013.



LUBBOCK (AP) — People living nearest to a radioactive waste dump site in West Texas would be barred from challenging the company operating the facility under a bill that opponents say further caters to the business.



Senate Bill 791 also encourages members of a compact, Texas and Vermont, to send their low-level waste elsewhere, allows for the company to take in additional, more radioactive material per year and seeks to prohibit public hearings or comment on some changes to the company’s license.



The bill from Sen. Kel Seliger, R-Amarillo, could be voted on as early as today. A similar bill has been filed in the House.



Residents of Eunice, N.M., live less than 10 miles from Dallas-based Waste Control Specialist’s 1,300-acre radioactive waste burial ground. Under the bill, they would no longer be able to claim to Texas licensing officials that their well-being is affected by the dump. The bill allows for challenges from Texas residents in Andrews County, home to the dump site, and any adjacent Texas county.



Eunice native Rose Gardner has long objected to the dump site, believing that leaks will lead to groundwater contamination. She said she’s long known that someday the company would try to silence her objections.



“There isn’t a Texan living near the state line,” the 54-year-old flower shop owner said. “They live 37 miles away in Andrews. And we’re sitting here like little kids playing tiddlywinks.”



Company spokesman Chuck McDonald said that part of the bill might not remain. He said Seliger spoke to Sen. Robert Duncan, R-Lubbock, about a proposed amendment.



“I think it’s really a moot point based on the exchange I heard in committee,” McDonald said.



A call seeking comment from Seliger was not immediately returned Tuesday.



The nuclear waste dump site, whose majority owner is billionaire and GOP mega-donor Harold Simmons, accepted its first low-level radioactive waste about a year ago, ending an expensive and years-long effort by the company to bury materials from medical, research and industrial activities and from nuclear power plants. Also buried there is PCB-tainted sludge dredged from the Hudson River in New York and tons of Cold-war era radioactive waste from a former uranium-processing plant in Ohio.



Environmental groups have opposed the company’s continual pressing for various types of waste to bury in the remote scrub brush terrain about 375 miles west of Dallas.



“It’s just always something more and I have to wonder where this will end,” said Karen Hadden, executive director of the Texas SEED Coalition.



Originally the site was to handle low-level waste from compact states, but last legislative session lawmakers approved allowing waste from more than three dozen states to be buried at the facility.



Seliger’s bill also seeks to promote sending low-level waste, known as Class A, out of Texas for burial and ups the annual radiation limit for the next two years from 220,000 to 300,000 curies so that states outside the compact can to dispose of hotter waste, known as Class B and C.



The company, Andrews County and the state stand to make more money from the hotter waste. The county receives 5 percent and the state 25 percent of the company’s revenues quarterly.



Lawmakers should play an active role in regulating any future plans by the company to expand the site’s capacity and any change in its license, including the forms, types or streams of waste, Duncan said.









is this a great country or what???




it now reminds me of Russia, except even old President Putin has more sense than slick rick perry.



rick perry is more of a cancer risk to Texas than the damn nuclear dump itself, but these fools that keep voting for him (big buisness), will vote for him again$



the only thing rick perry wants are all the poor, the middle class, the needy, the elderly, the disabled, he wants to force all these folks out of Texas, where Texas will only be a rich republican state, and industrialize the whole damn state, in my opinion.




these fools act like these nuclear dumps never leak, and this is simply not the case ;





Hanford Nuclear Tank Leaking Radioactive Waste



By SHANNON DININNY and MIKE BAKER 02/15/13 06:19 PM ET EST



Hanford Nuclear Tank, US Nuclear Sites, Hanford Nuclear Reservation, Nuclear Leak, Radioactive Waste, Us Nuclear Plants, Green News OLYMPIA, Wash. -- The long-delayed cleanup of the nation's most contaminated nuclear site became the subject of more bad news Friday, when Washington Gov. Jay Inslee announced that a radioactive waste tank there is leaking.



The news raises concerns about the integrity of similar tanks at south-central Washington's Hanford nuclear reservation and puts added pressure on the federal government to resolve construction problems with the plant being built to alleviate environmental and safety risks from the waste.



The tanks, which are already long past their intended 20-year life span, hold millions of gallons of a highly radioactive stew left from decades of plutonium production for nuclear weapons.



On Friday, the U.S. Department of Energy said liquid levels are decreasing in one of 177 underground tanks at the site. Monitoring wells near the tank have not detected higher radiation levels, but Inslee said the leak could be in the range of 150 gallons to 300 gallons over the course of a year and poses a potential long-term threat to groundwater and rivers.



"I am alarmed about this on many levels," Inslee said at a news conference. "This raises concerns, not only about the existing leak ... but also concerning the integrity of the other single shell tanks of this age."



Inslee said the state was assured years ago that such problems had been dealt with and he warned that spending cuts – particularly due to a budget fight in Congress – would create further risks at Hanford. Inslee said the cleanup must be a priority for the federal government.



"We are willing to exercise our rights using the legal system at the appropriate time. That should be clear," Inslee said.



Inslee said the state has a good partner in Energy Secretary Steven Chu but that he's concerned about whether Congress is committed to clean up the highly contaminated site.



The tank in question contains about 447,000 gallons of sludge, a mixture of solids and liquids with a mud-like consistency. The tank, built in the 1940s, is known to have leaked in the past, but was stabilized in 1995 when all liquids that could be pumped out of it were removed.



Inslee said the tank is the first to have been documented to be losing liquids since all Hanford tanks were stabilized in 2005. His staff said the federal government is working to assess other tanks.



At the height of World War II, the federal government created Hanford in the remote sagebrush of eastern Washington as part of a hush-hush project to build the atomic bomb. The site ultimately produced plutonium for the world's first atomic blast and for one of two atomic bombs dropped on Japan, effectively ending the war.



Plutonium production continued there through the Cold War. Today, Hanford is the nation's most contaminated nuclear site. Cleanup will cost billions of dollars and last decades.



Central to that cleanup is the removal of millions of gallons of a highly toxic, radioactive stew – enough to fill dozens of Olympic-size swimming pools – from 177 aging, underground tanks. Many of those tanks have leaked over time – an estimated 1 million gallons of waste – threatening the groundwater and the neighboring Columbia River, the largest waterway in the Pacific Northwest.



Twenty- eight of those tanks have double walls, allowing the Energy Department to pump waste from leaking single-shell tanks into them. However, there is very little space left in those double-shell tanks today.



In addition, construction of a $12.3 billion plant to convert the waste to a safe, stable form is years behind schedule and billions of dollars over budget. Technical problems have slowed the project, and several workers have filed lawsuits in recent months, claiming they were retaliated against for raising concerns about the plant's design and safety.



"We're out of time, obviously. These tanks are starting to fail now," said Tom Carpenter of the Hanford watchdog group Hanford Challenge. "We've got a problem. This is big."



Inslee said he would be traveling to Washington D.C. next week to discuss the problem further.



___



Dininny reported from Yakima, Wash.




On Feb 16, 2013, at 9:53 AM, Terry S. Singeltary Sr. wrote:




Texas Billionaire Builds Giant Nuclear Waste Dump




Dallas billionaire Harold Simmons has been called the king of Superfund sites. His companies, like publicly traded NL Industries, have over the years reportedly polluted numerous industrial sites with toxic metals and radiation. And another of his companies, Waste Control Specialists, is in the business of cleaning the messes up. It’s such a clever strategy that Dallas’ D Magazine in an insightful profile last year, called 79-year-old Simmons Dallas’ “most evil genius.“




For years WCS (a division of publicly traded Valhi) lobbied to open a nuclear waste disposal site Andrews County of west Texas near the New Mexico border. It’s dry, empty country. Oil fields provide most of the jobs. It took Simmons some six years of lobbying to get the permits to open his nuclear dump and start accepting what could ultimately be 60 million cubic feet of low-level nuclear waste.




This is not the kind of waste that would have gone to the ill-fated Yucca Mountain project in Nevada (i.e. spent fuel rods and such). But it’s pretty harsh stuff nonetheless: the refuse from nuclear medical applications, weapons programs, parts from old nuclear reactors. Already a worker at the site and a septic system have reportedly been tainted by plutonium. Mother Jones magazine published this piece on Simmons’ nuke dump earlier this week: “A Texas-Sized Plan For Nuclear Waste.”




Now I don’t think there’s anything wrong with building and operating a well regulated dump for low-level nuclear waste. After all, the stuff has got to go somewhere and someone’s got to be responsible for it. But the Mother Jones article raises some legitimate concerns.




Three staff members at the Texas Commission of Environmental Quality quit their jobs after their concerns that the nuke dump could pollute ground water with radiation were ignored. They believe that the uppermost layer of the massive Ogallala Aquifer lay just 14 feet below the dump. And if not the Ogallala, then it might be the Pecos Valley Aquifer. WCS has reportedly said that any such concerns are unjustified, though the D Magazine article explains that maps prepared by the Texas Water Development Board show that the areas where the nuke dump is located … “is underlain by four aquifers. In addition to the Dockum, there are three major aquifers: Ogallala (or High Plains), Pecos Valley (or Cenozoic Pecos Alluvium), and Edwards-Trinity Plateau. The TWDB and USGS websites both state that the Edwards-Trinity Plateau Aquifer is hydraulically connected to four major aquifers, including the Ogallala, and several minor aquifers, including the Dockum.”




More scientific concerns were voiced in this 2008 Texas Observer article “Good to Glow.“ None of that, nor a history of accidental contaminations at the site, nor outcry from environmental groups, stopped Texas’ Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact Commission from voting to approve the import of nuclear waste into Texas from other states. Six of the seven members of that commission were appointed by Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who reportedly received $250,000 in campaign cash from Simmons for the 2008 governor’s race.




Texas will reportedly receive $36 million a year for allowing the imports; Simmons will get millions more for watching over them. Ultimate responsibility if anything goes wrong falls on the state.




It just doesn’t look good. Like I said before, properly regulated nuclear dumps are not terrible in and of themselves. But when politically tainted commissions override the concerns of hydrologists willing to quit to make themselves heard, it’s probably time for Texans to demand an independent investigation of the true risks of Simmons’ nuke dump.













 
 
Interference at the EPA



Science and Politics at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency



snip...see full text ;







 
 
Friday, December 24, 2010



TEXAS NUCLEAR DUMP VOTE SET AMID HOLIDAY RUSH THANKS TO GOVERNOR RICK PERRY




I think the title should have read, "TEXAS LOSES TO BE NEXT BIG DUMPING GROUND FOR NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION RADIOACTIVE WASTE", thanks to Governor Rick Perry.


update on my father-in-law Dana (RED) Ashcraft of Miamisburg Ohio, and my best fishing buddy, and Poisoned AT THE MONSANTO MOUND, hospice has now been called in. ...



snip...



part II December 25, 2010



WHY then, was my father-in-laws work records denied him, with the claim that his records were buried deep in a mountain due to contamination ? now i am speaking of only his work records, not the radioactive waste itself, that you claim to be 1000 % safe today. tell me that. do you know how many different folks handled all that paper work over the years. also, the swimming pool in Miamisburg Ohio, the old one right down from the Monsanto Mound. the town had to shut it down and fill the swimming pool in with cement. wonder how many kids there were exposed over the decades, including my wife ?



MONSANTO MOUND MIAMISBURG OHIO SWIMMING POOL




" We acknowledge that some people near the Mound Plant have breathed, or will likely breathe, very small amounts of plutonium-238, hydrogen-3 (tritium), and other radioactive substances that will be or have been released into the air from the Mound Plant. And some people may be exposed to radioactive materials released from the Mound Plant into the area waterways (for example, tritium in the Miamisburg Community Park swimming pool). Nevertheless, there is no evidence that current environmental levels of these substances cause adverse health effects. "




Data Evaluation: Current Exposures




snip...



Then, they send all the radioactive waste to Texas. Now, we are going to multiply this by about 38 states ?




stupid is, as stupid does, and some times you just can't fix stupid $$$








My old fishing buddy (my father-in-law Red, deceased now), took these photos after I convinced him to get back with the Mayor and see if he would take him down there again, and if he did, get me a photo or two of this nuclear crap coming to Texas, thanks to the good Governor of Texas, rick perry, the steward of the environment that he is (NOT). well, here are the photo’s ;




Wednesday, August 6, 2008



Company advances on plan for West Texas nuclear dump



(railcars loaded with MOUND COLD WAR NUCLEAR AFTER-BIRTH headed to Texas)




















Wednesday, July 30, 2008









TEXAS WINS TO BE NEXT BIG DUMPING GROUND FOR NUCLEAR WEAPONS RADIOACTIVE WASTE









Friday, December 24, 2010


TEXAS NUCLEAR DUMP VOTE SET AMID HOLIDAY RUSH THANKS TO GOVERNOR RICK PERRY








Saturday, February 16, 2013


Governor Rick Perry's Nuclear Dump payday $250,000, but what about Texas?








personally, I think it’s time for slick rick perry and all his corporate cronies, it’s time for them to go, they have done enough harm to Texas and it’s people. rick perry is a cancer to Texas. environmental stewards they are not, nor will they ever be $





still disgusted in Baciff, Texas...tss





Saturday, February 16, 2013

Governor Rick Perry's Nuclear Dump payday $250,000, but what about Texas?

Texas Billionaire Builds Giant Nuclear Waste Dump





Dallas billionaire Harold Simmons has been called the king of Superfund sites. His companies, like publicly traded NL Industries, have over the years reportedly polluted numerous industrial sites with toxic metals and radiation. And another of his companies, Waste Control Specialists, is in the business of cleaning the messes up. It’s such a clever strategy that Dallas’ D Magazine in an insightful profile last year, called 79-year-old Simmons Dallas’ “most evil genius.“





For years WCS (a division of publicly traded Valhi) lobbied to open a nuclear waste disposal site Andrews County of west Texas near the New Mexico border. It’s dry, empty country. Oil fields provide most of the jobs. It took Simmons some six years of lobbying to get the permits to open his nuclear dump and start accepting what could ultimately be 60 million cubic feet of low-level nuclear waste.





This is not the kind of waste that would have gone to the ill-fated Yucca Mountain project in Nevada (i.e. spent fuel rods and such). But it’s pretty harsh stuff nonetheless: the refuse from nuclear medical applications, weapons programs, parts from old nuclear reactors. Already a worker at the site and a septic system have reportedly been tainted by plutonium. Mother Jones magazine published this piece on Simmons’ nuke dump earlier this week: “A Texas-Sized Plan For Nuclear Waste.”





Now I don’t think there’s anything wrong with building and operating a well regulated dump for low-level nuclear waste. After all, the stuff has got to go somewhere and someone’s got to be responsible for it. But the Mother Jones article raises some legitimate concerns.





Three staff members at the Texas Commission of Environmental Quality quit their jobs after their concerns that the nuke dump could pollute ground water with radiation were ignored. They believe that the uppermost layer of the massive Ogallala Aquifer lay just 14 feet below the dump. And if not the Ogallala, then it might be the Pecos Valley Aquifer. WCS has reportedly said that any such concerns are unjustified, though the D Magazine article explains that maps prepared by the Texas Water Development Board show that the areas where the nuke dump is located … “is underlain by four aquifers. In addition to the Dockum, there are three major aquifers: Ogallala (or High Plains), Pecos Valley (or Cenozoic Pecos Alluvium), and Edwards-Trinity Plateau. The TWDB and USGS websites both state that the Edwards-Trinity Plateau Aquifer is hydraulically connected to four major aquifers, including the Ogallala, and several minor aquifers, including the Dockum.”






More scientific concerns were voiced in this 2008 Texas Observer article “Good to Glow.“ None of that, nor a history of accidental contaminations at the site, nor outcry from environmental groups, stopped Texas’ Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact Commission from voting to approve the import of nuclear waste into Texas from other states. Six of the seven members of that commission were appointed by Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who reportedly received $250,000 in campaign cash from Simmons for the 2008 governor’s race.






Texas will reportedly receive $36 million a year for allowing the imports; Simmons will get millions more for watching over them. Ultimate responsibility if anything goes wrong falls on the state.






It just doesn’t look good. Like I said before, properly regulated nuclear dumps are not terrible in and of themselves. But when politically tainted commissions override the concerns of hydrologists willing to quit to make themselves heard, it’s probably time for Texans to demand an independent investigation of the true risks of Simmons’ nuke dump.












OLYMPIA, Wash. -- The long-delayed cleanup of the nation's most contaminated nuclear site became the subject of more bad news Friday, when Washington Gov. Jay Inslee announced that a radioactive waste tank there is leaking.







FEBRUARY 15, 2013





Hanford Nuclear Tank Leaking Radioactive Waste





By SHANNON DININNY and MIKE BAKER 02/15/13 06:19 PM ET EST







OLYMPIA, Wash. -- The long-delayed cleanup of the nation's most contaminated nuclear site became the subject of more bad news Friday, when Washington Gov. Jay Inslee announced that a radioactive waste tank there is leaking.





The news raises concerns about the integrity of similar tanks at south-central Washington's Hanford nuclear reservation and puts added pressure on the federal government to resolve construction problems with the plant being built to alleviate environmental and safety risks from the waste.





The tanks, which are already long past their intended 20-year life span, hold millions of gallons of a highly radioactive stew left from decades of plutonium production for nuclear weapons.





On Friday, the U.S. Department of Energy said liquid levels are decreasing in one of 177 underground tanks at the site. Monitoring wells near the tank have not detected higher radiation levels, but Inslee said the leak could be in the range of 150 gallons to 300 gallons over the course of a year and poses a potential long-term threat to groundwater and rivers.





"I am alarmed about this on many levels," Inslee said at a news conference. "This raises concerns, not only about the existing leak ... but also concerning the integrity of the other single shell tanks of this age."





Inslee said the state was assured years ago that such problems had been dealt with and he warned that spending cuts – particularly due to a budget fight in Congress – would create further risks at Hanford. Inslee said the cleanup must be a priority for the federal government.





"We are willing to exercise our rights using the legal system at the appropriate time. That should be clear," Inslee said.





Inslee said the state has a good partner in Energy Secretary Steven Chu but that he's concerned about whether Congress is committed to clean up the highly contaminated site.





The tank in question contains about 447,000 gallons of sludge, a mixture of solids and liquids with a mud-like consistency. The tank, built in the 1940s, is known to have leaked in the past, but was stabilized in 1995 when all liquids that could be pumped out of it were removed.





Inslee said the tank is the first to have been documented to be losing liquids since all Hanford tanks were stabilized in 2005. His staff said the federal government is working to assess other tanks.





At the height of World War II, the federal government created Hanford in the remote sagebrush of eastern Washington as part of a hush-hush project to build the atomic bomb. The site ultimately produced plutonium for the world's first atomic blast and for one of two atomic bombs dropped on Japan, effectively ending the war.





Plutonium production continued there through the Cold War. Today, Hanford is the nation's most contaminated nuclear site. Cleanup will cost billions of dollars and last decades.





Central to that cleanup is the removal of millions of gallons of a highly toxic, radioactive stew – enough to fill dozens of Olympic-size swimming pools – from 177 aging, underground tanks. Many of those tanks have leaked over time – an estimated 1 million gallons of waste – threatening the groundwater and the neighboring Columbia River, the largest waterway in the Pacific Northwest.





Twenty- eight of those tanks have double walls, allowing the Energy Department to pump waste from leaking single-shell tanks into them. However, there is very little space left in those double-shell tanks today.





In addition, construction of a $12.3 billion plant to convert the waste to a safe, stable form is years behind schedule and billions of dollars over budget. Technical problems have slowed the project, and several workers have filed lawsuits in recent months, claiming they were retaliated against for raising concerns about the plant's design and safety.





"We're out of time, obviously. These tanks are starting to fail now," said Tom Carpenter of the Hanford watchdog group Hanford Challenge. "We've got a problem. This is big."





Inslee said he would be traveling to Washington D.C. next week to discuss the problem further.





___





Dininny reported from Yakima, Wash.














Interference at the EPA




Science and Politics at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency




snip...see full text ;











Friday, December 24, 2010




TEXAS NUCLEAR DUMP VOTE SET AMID HOLIDAY RUSH THANKS TO GOVERNOR RICK PERRY





I think the title should have read, "TEXAS LOSES TO BE NEXT BIG DUMPING GROUND FOR NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION RADIOACTIVE WASTE", thanks to Governor Rick Perry.


update on my father-in-law Dana (RED) Ashcraft of Miamisburg Ohio, and my best fishing buddy, and Poisoned AT THE MONSANTO MOUND, hospice has now been called in. ...




TSS







part II December 25, 2010





WHY then, was my father-in-laws work records denied him, with the claim that his records were buried deep in a mountain due to contamination ? now i am speaking of only his work records, not the radioactive waste itself, that you claim to be 1000 % safe today. tell me that. do you know how many different folks handled all that paper work over the years. also, the swimming pool in Miamisburg Ohio, the old one right down from the Monsanto Mound. the town had to shut it down and fill the swimming pool in with cement. wonder how many kids there were exposed over the decades, including my wife ?





MONSANTO MOUND MIAMISBURG OHIO SWIMMING POOL





" We acknowledge that some people near the Mound Plant have breathed, or will likely breathe, very small amounts of plutonium-238, hydrogen-3 (tritium), and other radioactive substances that will be or have been released into the air from the Mound Plant. And some people may be exposed to radioactive materials released from the Mound Plant into the area waterways (for example, tritium in the Miamisburg Community Park swimming pool). Nevertheless, there is no evidence that current environmental levels of these substances cause adverse health effects. "





Data Evaluation: Current Exposures






snip...








Then, they send all the radioactive waste to Texas. Now, we are going to multiply this by about 38 states ?




stupid is, as stupid does, and some times you just can't fix stupid $$$











My old fishing buddy (my father-in-law Red, deceased now), took these photos after I convinced him to get back with the Mayor and see if he would take him down there again, and if he did, get me a photo or two of this nuclear crap coming to Texas, thanks to the good Governor of Texas, rick perry, the steward of the environment that he is (NOT). well, here are the photo’s ;






Wednesday, August 6, 2008




Company advances on plan for West Texas nuclear dump

 
 







 
(railcars loaded with MOUND COLD WAR NUCLEAR AFTER-BIRTH headed to Texas)
 
 
 

 
 
 
Wednesday, July 30, 2008
 
 
 
 
TEXAS WINS TO BE NEXT BIG DUMPING GROUND FOR NUCLEAR WEAPONS RADIOACTIVE WASTE
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
http://sciencebushwhacked.blogspot.com/2008/07/texas-wins-to-be-next-big-dumping.html
 
 
 
 
personally, I think it’s time for slick rick perry, and all his corporate cronies, it’s time for them to go, they have done enough harm to Texas and it’s people. environmental stewards they are not.
 
 
 
 
TSS